A Quick Look at Some Interesting Hydroelectric Power Plant Facts

Generating electricity through the use of water is one of the most efficient ways to provide a viable source of power to a growing global population. The true workhorses behind these methods are the hydroelectric plants themselves and they are modern marvels in every sense of the world. Let us take a look at a handful of interesting facts associated with a typical hydroelectric power plant in order to appreciate why these facilities are superior to more traditional options.

A Growing Presence

Due to the fact that we are now beginning to fully embrace alternatives to fossil fuels, it should come as no great surprise that hydroelectric power is here to stay. As of 2006, this type of energy equated to 20 per cent of global electricity production.

More Than a Fringe Element

Hydroelectric power has been gaining ground in certain regions of the world; particularly those which have immediate access to ample amounts of water. There are even some nations which rely upon hydroelectric power as their main source of energy. These include Norway, Venezuela, Canada, Brazil, and Switzerland.

What About the Tides?

One emerging form of hydroelectric generation involves the use of the tides. The movements associated with large bodies of water are able to mechanically generate electricity. The good news about this method is that the tides will always ebb and flow; offering up a completely reliable means to produce electricity.

No Small Feat of Engineering

Hydroelectric power is often generated with dams, as these structures are able to harness the presence of gravity as well as massive amounts of water. Dams have grown larger and larger over the years. The most massive dam in the world is the Three Gorges Dam. It stands no fewer than 185 metres high and it is 2.3 kilometres long. It is capable of generating 22,500 megawatts of electricity.

The United States is Still Lagging Behind

While the advantages of a hydroelectric power plant are clear, it is a bit ironic to note that the United States is lagging behind compared to many other nations. Only 13 per cent of their electricity is generated in such a manner. However, it is likely that more facilities will be developed in the future as the reliance upon fossil fuels continues to wane.

If you would like to learn more about the benefits of hydroelectric power, please contact one of our specialists.